Indexed: Tongues take a while to untie.
(I almost always think of the perfect response… minutes or hours later. *sigh*)

Indexed: Tongues take a while to untie.

(I almost always think of the perfect response… minutes or hours later. *sigh*)

Tags: images so true
dynastylnoire:

so-treu:

dudeimjarell:

thewritershelpers:

uberwench:

skokielibrary:

teen-stuff-at-the-library:

A Great Guide on How to Cite Social Media Using Both MLA and APA styles 

You’ll probably find this useful at some point.

Man, where was this chart when I was in library school?

Reblogging because EVERYONE (ESPECIALLY COLLEGE STUDENTS) needs this in their life. -H

ha

CITE ME AND OTHER TUMBLR USERS IF YOU USE US IN YOUR SCHOOL/ACADEMIA SHIT
I’M SO FORREAL
CITE. US.

serious do it

dynastylnoire:

so-treu:

dudeimjarell:

thewritershelpers:

uberwench:

skokielibrary:

teen-stuff-at-the-library:

A Great Guide on How to Cite Social Media Using Both MLA and APA styles

You’ll probably find this useful at some point.

Man, where was this chart when I was in library school?

Reblogging because EVERYONE (ESPECIALLY COLLEGE STUDENTS) needs this in their life. -H

ha

CITE ME AND OTHER TUMBLR USERS IF YOU USE US IN YOUR SCHOOL/ACADEMIA SHIT

I’M SO FORREAL

CITE. US.

serious do it

Apparently summer = weeding in my corner of libraryland…

I seem to be setting up a habit of doing weeding projects during summer. To be fair, it’s a good time for an all-encompassing projects, and weeding always ends up being all-encompassing for me. :-)

Last year was the Reference collection, this year it’s the R section—LC calls it “Medicine”, but the materials therein are used by our Nursing, Psychology, and Special Education programs. And this year, I’ve upped the ante: not only am I weeding, I’m also putting a fairly significant effort toward purchasing new materials that will fill specific needs for the Psychology and Special Ed programs, along with a few updates for Nursing (our Nursing program relies almost entirely on journal articles rather than books, at least as far as the library is concerned).

About the last two weeks of the semester I devoted to identifying titles for expressed needs in Psych & Special Ed so we could get the order process going on those in hopes of having some on the shelves by fall semester, then last week I started The Weed.

I have filled a book cart (165 volumes, according to my spreadsheet) and I’m not even done with RA yet. Yay?

Anyway, looking at some of the cruft that’s been in our collection for years (even decades) is fascinating and sad. It’s fun to theorize what class might have called for a particular book. On the other hand, I learned today that there was a time in the history of this library that they kept basically every book given to them to get their collection numbers up, which explains some of the books I’ve been seeing… yikes. (Despite arguments to the contrary, sometimes “weeding” really is an apt term!)

It’s also sad how many of these books haven’t had any activity on their records since the library moved the records to Voyager in 2002. I know in general that many library books never end up circulating, but it’s still depressing to consider the work that went into adding them to the system, and all for nothing.

The thing that has me pondering the most, though, is how much the context of my college’s programs affect the decisions on many of these books. Sure, some of them are getting to be rather dated, but if we had a history of medicine class, for example, I’d be buying a few things to add rather than weeding most of that bunch. The health care policy books from the 70s, 80s, and 90s would be awesome for a project examining the history of government health initiatives (perhaps in comparison to ACA), but here they simply aren’t needed—as evidenced by their low-to-nonexistent circ numbers. Community needs make a big difference!

libraryjournal:

Your Monday Morning Mantra!

It’s my Everyday Mantra, really. :-)

libraryjournal:

Your Monday Morning Mantra!

It’s my Everyday Mantra, really. :-)

Reblogged from Bibliotheque 2.0
The Navy is making 365 devices at first, with more to follow. The Navy plans to send about five to each submarine to be shared between multiple people. Each reader is preloaded with 300 books that will never change. The selection includes modern fiction like Tom Clancy and James Patterson, who are popular in the Navy, as well as nonfiction, the classics, and “a lot of naval history,” says Carrato. The library program is supposed to make sailors feel more at home when they’re abroad. But the limited selection — a small subset of the Navy’s 108,000 digital library titles — reflects the military’s culture of imposed discipline. iPads, Kindles, and Nooks would also allow sailors to download whatever titles they want (although finding an internet signal would still be a challenge). The NeRD lets the Navy control their reading habits just as it does with their diet and sleep schedule.
Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse