Cali the Librarian

Apr 14

Emerald Publishing Turns Off the Paywall For Special Issue of Library Hi Tech (Freebie Alert) | LJ INFOdocket -

As part of their National Library Week celebration, Emerald Publishing has turned off the paywall (now through April 19, 2014) for a special issue of Library Hi Tech published last year.

If you visit this page, you’ll find the complete and linked table of contents for Library Hi Tech (Volume 31, Issue 2; 2013).

Depending on your interests, the articles are of varying usefulness, but it’s worth a look. :)

Apr 12

Free Database Access for National Library Week

In honor of National Library Week next week (starting Sunday, April 13), some databases are accessible for free:

(links go to the write-ups at infoDOCKET)

:-)

Mar 03

Cali the Librarian turned 3 on Saturday!
Wow, I’ve been on tumblr a lot longer than I remembered. :-) I’m afraid I’ve been neglecting it lately (I hope to resume regular posts soon, but I won’t make any promises lest I end up breaking them!).

Cali the Librarian turned 3 on Saturday!

Wow, I’ve been on tumblr a lot longer than I remembered. :-) I’m afraid I’ve been neglecting it lately (I hope to resume regular posts soon, but I won’t make any promises lest I end up breaking them!).

(Source: assets)

Dec 27

Know My App -

For consumers, CTIA-The Wireless Association®, along with its members and the app developer community, created KnowMyApp.org so you know how the most popular apps use data. With Intertek Testing Services North America, we offer data usage estimates on some of the most popular apps in the Apple and Google stores.

What a great idea! The number of apps they’ve tested so far is a little slim (some of their categories don’t have any apps in them yet), but this could be an excellent resource. :)

(Source: infodocket.com)

Dec 25

And now for a non-library Christmas greeting… from my two cats. ;-)

And now for a non-library Christmas greeting… from my two cats. ;-)

calimae:

Book tree! :-)
(Borrowed from my library’s facebook page—I tried but couldn’t link it directly.)

Reblogging because Christmas. :-)
(For the record, all of those books are the result of my summer weeding in the reference section. Hooray for “recycling” books!)

calimae:

Book tree! :-)

(Borrowed from my library’s facebook page—I tried but couldn’t link it directly.)

Reblogging because Christmas. :-)

(For the record, all of those books are the result of my summer weeding in the reference section. Hooray for “recycling” books!)

Dec 17

Excited and Overwhelmed: First Year Students in the Library | Inside Higher Ed -

This new report, Learning the Ropes, confirms what we already know (but sometimes forget). For most first year students, even small college libraries are many times larger than the school library they may have used previously. It’s hard for first year students to come up with keywords to search for information on topics they don’t know much about. Sorting through the multitude of results is difficult, and making sense of articles in scholarly journals (which they have never seen before) is a challenge. The strategies that have worked before don’t work as well with college-level research. Many students in the study stepped up to the challenge of using library databases for their work, but some continued to rely primarily on Google.

Dec 10

Book tree! :-)
(Borrowed from my library’s facebook page—I tried but couldn’t link it directly.)

Book tree! :-)

(Borrowed from my library’s facebook page—I tried but couldn’t link it directly.)

Dec 06

Need suggestions for digital image hosting/organizing software

Our art department is looking to create an online collection of art works that includes various bits of department-defined information (like the artist’s statement) and wants suggestions of software they could use. In the end they want the collection to be searchable and to have control over which parts of the record are publicly viewable, but for now I’m focusing on locating feasible software and leaving the evaluation for later.

So far I have these on my list:

Is there anything obvious that I’m missing? I took a digital libraries class in grad school and I know I worked with CONTENTdm (though of course I couldn’t think of the name when the art people were in my office!), but other than that I’d have to consult my notes. ;-) I suspect we’ll be leaning toward open source, but at this point I want to provide all of the possible options.

Dec 04

Barbara Fister, "From Conversations to Things," Inside Higher Ed -

stephenfrancoeur:

Pull quote: “In an era when libraries acquired materials important to their communities, negotiating rights and paying for access was not a major hindrance to conversation. But as libraries become merely bill payers and publishers the owners and curators of knowledge, we’ve seen the value of public knowledge retreat in the face of private property and individual productivity.”

Dec 03

Find the Deadlines to Ship Packages for the Holidays - USA.gov Blog - United States Government Blog -

Not library-related, but potentially helpful for those sending things far and wide for the holidays. :-)

Nov 26

Winter Weather Driving Tips

I’m sure there are other lists out there, but these are the things that really piss me off about other drivers, so I’m making my own list. This only pertains to actual driving; there are plenty of other lists about what you should have in your car in the event you get stuck somewhere.

1. Visibility is Key. In other words: clean off your damn car. You may think that one clear patch on the windshield is sufficient, but do yourself (and everyone else on the road) a favor and clean off ALL the windows so you can see properly. And if you can reach, brush any loose snow off the top of your car or else you’re creating your own mini-blizzard as you go down the road. Also remember that your bumper will accumulate snow that obscures your headlights, so clean that off, too. (And yes, if it’s precipitating, your headlights should be on. I can’t believe how many people like to drive stealth-mode in bad weather.)

2. Slow Down. If the road is wet or snowy, take at least 5-10 mph off your usual speed because you cannot guarantee you will always have traction. If there’s any form of water on the pavement, there can be ice so adjust your speed accordingly. (Only exception: when it’s sunny and the water on the road is due to the snow melting.)

3. Try to Avoid Stopping. Stopping at stop signs especially can be problematic because those roads often aren’t the ones salted/plowed right away, so go ahead and roll the stop if there’s no one else at/near the intersection. This helps you avoid sliding while you brake and while you try to resume speed. [Note: I’m not sure about the legality of this advice, but I would assume that the police have more pressing concerns than ticketing you during a snowstorm.] Stopping in other scenarios (e.g. stop lights) is often unavoidable, however, so…

4. When Stopping, Leave Plenty of Room. My personal rule of thumb is to stop at least one car length behind where I ordinarily would (whether it’s behind the stop line or another car) to allow space to slide a bit without causing an accident. This will also give you space if the car in front of you slips while starting to move again. Related: start braking way earlier than you think you need to so that if you do slide at any point, you have less momentum driving you into the next car/the intersection/whatever.

5. Allow Extra Space for EVERYTHING. Don’t tailgate. Don’t attempt a turn across/into traffic until you have enough time/space to react if you slide. Assume you’re going to slide when stopping, starting, and turning and plan accordingly.

6. Minimize Distractions. Turn off the radio unless you really need it for the weather/traffic report. Don’t even think about talking on the phone. Drinking hot beverages also isn’t wise. Your focus needs to be on the road and the other cars on it. You may be confident in your winter driving abilities but that doesn’t eliminate the possibility of someone else sliding into you.

7. BE PATIENT. I like to think that snow (and especially ice) are nature’s way of telling us to slow the f—- down. Leave extra time to get where you need to be. Winter is not the time to be rushing anywhere. Stay at home if possible while it’s precipitating, or at least combine any errands so you only have to go out once (your car will be warmer that way, too).

Nov 07

“It’s hard for me to even remember the last time I was in a library.

[I]t’s impossible to see a world where we keep libraries open simply to pretend they still serve a purpose for which they no longer serve.” —

The End Of The Library | TechCrunch

Well, white dude with I’m guessing considerable stock in Google, is the library just there for your needs or purposes?

Maybe you enjoyed your exercise in wordplay and making points already made. But what was your point again? Books make libraries so without books libraries aren’t libraries? Books look different so libraries can’t be libraries? Libraries look different so libraries can’t be libraries? You don’t need libraries for books so we don’t need libraries? I’m sorry, what?

Oh but wait, we’re pretending? Pretending what? Pretending there’s an access divide? Pretending there’s a digital divide? Pretending information illiteracy? Pretending folks lack job skills? Pretending college students need help with citation (BAHA HAHAHAHAHHA)? Did I get a Masters in Pretending? I MEAN I DO HAVE A GREAT IMAGINATION SO I PROBS GOT STRAIGHT A’S. OR P’S FOR PRETENDING. I’m sorry, what?

(via yellowdecorations)

Also read this from BeerBrarian - The End of “The End of Libraries”

On Sunday, October 14th, yet another “End of Libraries” piece appeared. Per usual, it was written by a white male with no use for libraries, because every single time this trope appears, that’s part of the author’s demographic background. Beyond that, it’s a crucial part of the author’s background. It is overwhelmingly affluent white men who argue that because they do not use something, it has no value for anyone. Libraries. The Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program. Affordable health care. It’s the same argument.

(via thedanaash)

"The internet has replaced the importance of libraries as a repository for knowledge." Ah, yes, because you can trust everything you read on the internet.

Republicans play this game all the time. “I don’t need it, therefore it’s not important and we should get rid of it.” I can vividly remember the last time I was in a library. It was three weeks ago. I needed to do research and the material I needed was not online. Not every book is completely indexed in Google Books. And yes, an ebook is cheaper and faster than buying a physical copy of a book - but it’s harder to skim through an ebook quickly, and the physical copy at the library costs you nothing (up front; tax dollars etc etc).

Like I said, I was at the library three weeks ago. It was around 4 pm on a Tuesday. And you know what? It was CROWDED. There was a packed sign-up sheet for the computers. Kids and parents abounded in the children’s section. Older people and teenagers read at the tables in the main area. I had to wait in line to check out my book.

Before that, I had spent a lot of quality time on my library’s website. I like to read both physical books and ebooks. My library does Kindle loans. OK, their website is a crappy government website, and it can be a little difficult to navigate, but it’s doable. I read books I probably couldn’t or wouldn’t pay full price for, AKA a big part of the purpose of a library.

Libraries are not useless in the digital age, and even more importantly, they aren’t all empty. Just because YOU, PERSONALLY do not need or use something doesn’t make it a charming  but impractical relic of a long-forgotten age.

(via thebicker)

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

Oct 28

xtoxictears:

I’m sitting in work with actual tears forming in my eyes while I’m trying to laugh silently, oh help

If you’re having a bad Monday, here’s a laugh for you. :-D

xtoxictears:

I’m sitting in work with actual tears forming in my eyes while I’m trying to laugh silently, oh help

If you’re having a bad Monday, here’s a laugh for you. :-D

(Source: cineraria, via itakeupspace)

Oct 24

Open access: six myths to put to rest -