The unreal is more powerful than the real…

The unreal is more powerful than the real…

Reblogged from Libraryland
"What you read when you don’t have to…"

"What you read when you don’t have to…"

Reblogged from First Book
Remember that there are only three kinds of things anyone need ever do. (1) Things we ought to do (2) Things we’ve got to do (3) Things we like doing. I say this because some people seem to spend so much of their time doing things for none of the three reasons, things like reading books they don’t like because other people read them. Things you ought to do are things like doing one’s school work or being nice to people. Things one has to do are things like dressing and undressing, or household shopping. Things one likes doing — but of course I don’t know what you like. Perhaps you’ll write and tell me one day.
— C. S. Lewis, in a letter to Sarah, his godchild, on 3 April 1949 via Stan Carey (via bobulate)
Reblogged from Bobulate
thelifeguardlibrarian:

Why Authors Tweet

When they use social media, authors have as many personae to choose from as they do in their other writings. Some strike poses that effectively increase the distance between them and their readers, foiling voyeurs. 

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Why Authors Tweet

When they use social media, authors have as many personae to choose from as they do in their other writings. Some strike poses that effectively increase the distance between them and their readers, foiling voyeurs. 

Who owns Lolita? Not the girl, of course — Humbert Humbert tried that and look where it got him. In 2012, who owns the book? Or at least the copyright in the book? And for that matter, who owns The End of Eternity, The Body Snatchers, Inherit the Wind, Tolkein’s The Return of the King and C.S. Lewis’ The Magician’s Nephew? Even, ironically, Why Johnny Can’t Read? As recently as 1978, the answer would have been “You do. We all do.”
— Jennifer Jenkins discusses the public domain in “‘Til the End of Eternity” for HuffPost (via thelifeguardlibrarian)
Of the current top ten e-book bestsellers on Amazon, four of them are self-published. These aren’t flukes: They’ve been in the top ten more than 50 days on average…

…This is staggering, and it’s a part of the story that hasn’t yet been fully explored.
Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse
The honest answer to this last question should disappoint everyone: Publishers can’t charge enough money for 60-page books to survive; thus, writers can’t make a living by writing them. But readers are beginning to feel that this shouldn’t be their problem. Worse, many readers believe that they can just jump on YouTube and watch the author speak at a conference, or skim his blog, and they will have absorbed most of what he has to say on a given subject. In some cases this is true and suggests an enduring problem for the business of publishing. In other cases it clearly isn’t true and suggests an enduring problem for our intellectual life.

Sam Harris on the future of books (via curiositycounts)

[the full article is definitely worth a read]

Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse