But did you know that AOL still has 3 million dialup “access” subscribers — generating a third of the company’s revenue and likely most of its profit? That might be more paying U.S. subscribers than Spotify and Hulu Plus have combined.

AOL Dialup Just Had Its ‘Best’ Quarter In A Decade, And Still Has 3 Million Subscribers - SplatF (via infoneer-pulse)

The fact that there are still people with dial-up seems to be widely ignored and it really shouldn’t be.

Reblogged from Infoneer Pulse
How Much Data Is Created Every Minute? [INFOGRAPHIC]

How Much Data Is Created Every Minute? [INFOGRAPHIC]

INFOGRAPHIC: U.S. Public Libraries Weather the Storm

INFOGRAPHIC: U.S. Public Libraries Weather the Storm

libraryadvocates:

How to Determine If A Controversial Statement Is Scientifically True

Extra Credit: Visit Your Local Library and Consult Librarians and Reference Materials
You’ve done your homework, looked up some studies, read both sides of an argument, and you’re still not sure what to believe, or if there’s enough information to believe anything. That’s great—you’re still hungry for information, and there’s one place left to get it: your local library. Photo by Manchester City Library.
If you catch yourself unable to download a specific study, or the study is so old (or too new!) that it’s not available, or you just want help getting to the bottom of an issue, visit your library’s reference desk. Often, public libraries—and especially university libraries—have free access to scholarly journals and their archives so you can download, print, and read full-text articles you wouldn’t be able to get at home. Even many university libraries only require student ID if you’re going to check something out, so they’re a great resource for everyone.
“Most university librarians will happily provide you a copy of a paper if you or someone you know is enrolled in the university,” McRaney adds. If you are going to chat up your local reference librarian, see what they think of the topic, and if they can do some digging on your behalf. Most often, they can do some research for you and present you with findings to read through, or they can at least help guide you to authoritative sources on the topic.


Extra points for mentioning libraries in this article! The rest of the tips are awesome, too (and they’re more than likely what the librarian will do in the course of helping someone who asks a question like this).

libraryadvocates:

How to Determine If A Controversial Statement Is Scientifically True

Extra Credit: Visit Your Local Library and Consult Librarians and Reference Materials

You’ve done your homework, looked up some studies, read both sides of an argument, and you’re still not sure what to believe, or if there’s enough information to believe anything. That’s great—you’re still hungry for information, and there’s one place left to get it: your local library. Photo by Manchester City Library.

If you catch yourself unable to download a specific study, or the study is so old (or too new!) that it’s not available, or you just want help getting to the bottom of an issue, visit your library’s reference desk. Often, public libraries—and especially university libraries—have free access to scholarly journals and their archives so you can download, print, and read full-text articles you wouldn’t be able to get at home. Even many university libraries only require student ID if you’re going to check something out, so they’re a great resource for everyone.

“Most university librarians will happily provide you a copy of a paper if you or someone you know is enrolled in the university,” McRaney adds. If you are going to chat up your local reference librarian, see what they think of the topic, and if they can do some digging on your behalf. Most often, they can do some research for you and present you with findings to read through, or they can at least help guide you to authoritative sources on the topic.

Extra points for mentioning libraries in this article! The rest of the tips are awesome, too (and they’re more than likely what the librarian will do in the course of helping someone who asks a question like this).

Reblogged from Library Advocates
CISPA: SOPA’s Meaner, Uglier Cousin, Will Kill Your Privacy. [infographic]

CISPA: SOPA’s Meaner, Uglier Cousin, Will Kill Your Privacy. [infographic]

pewinternet:

Chart of the week: Broadband and dial-up adoption, over time
Our latest survey shows that 66% of Americans have braoadband connections at home. In February 2001, when about half of adults were online, only 4% of American households had broadband access.

pewinternet:

Chart of the week: Broadband and dial-up adoption, over time

Our latest survey shows that 66% of Americans have braoadband connections at home. In February 2001, when about half of adults were online, only 4% of American households had broadband access.

Reblogged from Pew Internet
How has the internet changed education? [infographic]

How has the internet changed education? [infographic]


…”The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a ‘cybersecurity crime’,” writes TechDirt’s Leigh Beadon. “Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all.”…

The Atlantic Wire - Why CISPA Is Worse Than SOPA

…”The government would be able to search information it collects under CISPA for the purposes of investigating American citizens with complete immunity from all privacy protections as long as they can claim someone committed a ‘cybersecurity crime’,” writes TechDirt’s Leigh Beadon. “Basically it says the 4th Amendment does not apply online, at all.”…

The Atlantic Wire - Why CISPA Is Worse Than SOPA

pewinternet:

Infographic for your Monday morning - Is personalized search getting too personal? User Thoughts on Personalized Search
(Via Search Engine Journal)
(Read more on search engine use)

pewinternet:

Infographic for your Monday morning - Is personalized search getting too personal? User Thoughts on Personalized Search

(Via Search Engine Journal)

(Read more on search engine use)

Reblogged from Pew Internet